Maintenance and Repairs

In order to maintain and improve the current housing portfolio the Property Department carryout the following procedures:

  • Quinquennial surveys (Planned Maintenance)
  • Interim repairs (repairs arising between quinquennial surveys)
  • Minor / major improvements

Quinquennial Surveys

The aim of the Quinquennial Surveys is to ascertain the necessary maintenance works to each individual property and it?s surroundings to reduce the likelihood of material failure or the performance degradation of an item or material. Below provides a breakdown of the Quinquennial process:

a. The Property Department maintains a register of quinquennial inspection dates for each property, which are on a 5-year rolling programme. When the property is due an inspection, notification is issued from the Diocesan Surveyor to each occupant in January each year.

b. The Diocesan Surveyor inspects the properties on the annual quinquennial list to ascertain what repairs are necessary both immediately and during the ensuing 5 years, and a report is prepared for the Houses Committee.

c. A specification for the works is prepared and a copy is sent to the occupant for agreement or modification within a specified period, usually 14 days. The Diocesan Surveyor prepares a list of contractors to tender for the works. The occupant may also nominate contractors to be invited to tender. A copy of the full quinquennial inspection report is available in Church House for inspection.

d. At the end of the 14 days the specification of works is sent to appropriate contractors who are invited to estimate for the work.

e. The estimates are referred to the Houses Committee, which will normally accept the lowest. On occasions further estimates may be requested. Items raised by the occupant under b., which the Property Manager feels unable to authorise, will be raised specifically with the Committee for a decision.

f. Once the Committee has accepted the estimate, the Diocesan Surveyor places an order for the work to be carried out according to an agreed timetable. The occupant is advised as to who will do the work, is sent a copy of the authorised specification, and asked to negotiate a start date with the contractors. If there is any undue delay in the commencement of the work the occupant is asked to notify the Diocesan Surveyor.

g. If there is cause for concern with the way the work is being undertaken by the contractor, the occupant should notify the Diocesan Surveyor of his dissatisfaction immediately.

h. The Diocesan Surveyor will inspect the works on completion prior to the final payment being authorised. The Diocesan Surveyor will endeavour to carry out interim inspections whilst the work is in progress to ensure work is progressing to a high standard.

i. The occupant will be asked by the Diocesan Surveyor to confirm that the work has been carried out satisfactorily as far as can be seen. If the appropriate form is not returned to the Diocesan Surveyor, it will be assumed that the occupant is satisfied with the work done and the contractors will be paid.

Interim Repairs

Interim repairs are defined as ?maintenance works carried out to no predetermined plan? this is due to the way the work is generated for example: a broken fence resulting from a storm.

Interim repairs occur as a result of an unexpected problem arising. All problems should be reported directly to the Property Department without delay in order for the department to establish the extent of the repair required. The Department may decide that the works require immediate action or some non-urgent repair work may be deferred until the next financial year or quinquennial survey. All occupants are asked to follow this procedure in order for the Property Department to manage the property budgets provided. The interim works fall under two headings:

  • Essential Repairs
  • Non Essential Repair Work

Essential Repairs

Essential repairs are works, which require immediate attention in order to avoid serious consequences. Essential repairs maybe required for the following reasons:

  • There is a danger to the occupants i.e. gas leak, electrical fault.
  • There is a danger to the public i.e. fallen tree or wall by public footpath.
  • The security of the building is affected i.e. broken window, door lock not working.
  • A loss of a basic service i.e. broken water pipe, central heating boiler failure.
  • A potential hazard, which may result in additional damage to the house and/or its contents i.e., leaking water tank or roof.

In any of these instances, the Property Department should be contacted immediately. If unable to contact the Property Department the occupant should put in hand the necessary work as quickly as possible, having due regard to the suitability of contractors and the need for economy, and advise the Property Department as soon as possible thereafter and obtain an official order number.

It is suggested that if any essential works occur out of office hours that the occupant should use the Emergency Repairs list of approved contractors (see below). If they are not available then a suitably qualified contractor maybe sorted from an alternative source. Please note that a NICEIC approved contractor should complete all electrical works and a CORGI approved contractor should perform all works to gas appliances.

Emergency repair numbers (67.22 KB) PDF

To check the contractors authenticity please use the following:

NICEIC Tel: 020 7564 2323 Website: www.niceic.org.uk

CORGI Tel: 01256 372 498 Website: www.corgi-gas.com

 

Non Essential Repair Work

Non-essential repair work is defined as repair works, which are desirable, but do not necessarily require urgent attention.

The occupant should always contact the Property Department without delay and allow the department to decide the extent of the problem. The Department will decide when the works should proceed.

If non-essential repair works are carried out unauthorised, the Houses Committee reserves the right to decline to meet the cost incurred.Non Essential Repair Work
Non-essential repair work is defined as repair works, which are desirable, but do not necessarily require urgent attention.

The occupant should always contact the Property Department without delay and allow the department to decide the extent of the problem. The Department will decide when the works should proceed.

If non-essential repair works are carried out unauthorised, the Houses Committee reserves the right to decline to meet the cost incurred.

Minor / Major Improvements

Improvements must have the consent of the Houses Committee (whether financed by the Committee or not), and in certain instances the Church Commissioners and the Patron, as well as the occupant.

Where a scheme of improvements is approved by the Houses Committee simply to bring the house up to basic standards, the Diocese tries to meet all the cost.

After meeting these needs, financial resources for improvements, which are beyond basic house standards may be limited or not available and are applied according to, assessed priority of need. Contributions from the occupant and/or PCC of approximately half or two-thirds of the cost are usual.

The Diocesan Surveyor may suggest improvements at the time of the quinquennial survey.

However, occupants and/or parishes are welcome to make proposals in the meantime; but such proposals should include suggestions as to how the proposed work should be financed.

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